Welcome to our online store!
You have no items in your basket.
Close
Filters
Search

Architect Patron & Craftsman in Tudor & Early Stuart England

Author/EditorP. S. Barnwell (Editor)
Paula Henderson (Editor)
Publisher: Shaun Tyas
ISBN: 9781907730627
Pub Date01/01/2017
BindingHardback
Pages202
€47.30
excluding shipping
Availability: 2 In Stock
+ -

This book contains the papers from a weekend conference held at Rewley House in Oxford in 2016 in honour of Professor Malcolm Airs who taught there from 1975 to 2006, and whose scholarship has centred on the domestic architecture of the Tudor and Stuart period, particularly on building processes and craftsmen. It was a period in which Gothic elements continued to be used, but mixed with details inspired by a Classical antiquity. This was the English Renaissance, but the systematic study of Classical models and the publication of handbooks of Classical architecture, and the profession of architecture, were all in their infancy. The blend of styles is unique to England; while it used to be dismissed as backward it is today celebrated for its inventiveness and pioneering achievements. In these papers Professor Airs’ friends and colleagues pay tribute to his scholarship in a series of essays on topics which have interested him. They include the reception and appreciation of the architecture of the Tudor and Early Stuart period, studies of the sources of inspiration for individual house designs, using both written and architectural evidence, the setting of houses, planning, fixtures and decoration.

The contributors are: William Whyte, Nicholas Cooper, Pete Smith, David Adshead, Paula Henderson, Sally Jeffrey, Geoffrey Tyack, Maurice Howard, Claire Gapper, Kathryn Davies, and Mark Girouard.

This book contains the papers from a weekend conference held at Rewley House in Oxford in 2016 in honour of Professor Malcolm Airs who taught there from 1975 to 2006, and whose scholarship has centred on the domestic architecture of the Tudor and Stuart period, particularly on building processes and craftsmen. It was a period in which Gothic elements continued to be used, but mixed with details inspired by a Classical antiquity. This was the English Renaissance, but the systematic study of Classical models and the publication of handbooks of Classical architecture, and the profession of architecture, were all in their infancy. The blend of styles is unique to England; while it used to be dismissed as backward it is today celebrated for its inventiveness and pioneering achievements. In these papers Professor Airs’ friends and colleagues pay tribute to his scholarship in a series of essays on topics which have interested him. They include the reception and appreciation of the architecture of the Tudor and Early Stuart period, studies of the sources of inspiration for individual house designs, using both written and architectural evidence, the setting of houses, planning, fixtures and decoration.

The contributors are: William Whyte, Nicholas Cooper, Pete Smith, David Adshead, Paula Henderson, Sally Jeffrey, Geoffrey Tyack, Maurice Howard, Claire Gapper, Kathryn Davies, and Mark Girouard.

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
*
*
Bad
Excellent
*
*
*
)
CLOSE