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Architectural Heritage of Yemen: Buildings that Fill My Eye

Author/EditorGingko Library Art Series (Author)
Publisher: Gingko Library
ISBN: 9781909942073
Pub Date30/06/2017
BindingPaperback
Pages240
Dimensions (mm)235(h) * 241(w) * 26(d)
Twenty chapters, authored by leading scholars from around the world, explore the astonishing variety of building styles and traditions that have evolved over millennia in a region of diverse terrains, extreme climates and distinctive local histories.
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Twenty chapters, authored by leading scholars from around the world, explore the astonishing variety of building styles and traditions that have evolved over millennia in a region of diverse terrains, extreme climates and distinctive local histories. Generations of highly-skilled masons, carpenters and craftspeople have deftly employed the materials-to-hand and indigenous technologies to create urban architectural assemblages, gardens and rural landscapes that dialogue harmoniously with the natural contours and geological conditions of southern Arabia. A sharp escalation in military action and violence in the country since the 1990s has had a devastating impact on the region's rich cultural heritage. In bringing together the astute observations and reflections of an international and interdisciplinary group of acclaimed scholars, the principal aim of this book is to raise awareness among the general public and policy makers of Yemen's long history of cultural creativity, and of the very urgent need for international collaboration to protect it and its people from the destructive forces that have beset the region.Following the editor's introduction, the book is divided into three parts.
Part One introduces readers to the astonishing variety of architecture and building traditions across the country, from the Red Sea coast, eastward into the mountainous highlands, to the edge of the Sahara desert, and southward into the deep, dramatic wadis of the Hadhramaut. Part Two is dedicated to exploring the issues and the challenges of conserving and preserving Yemen's rich architectural heritage. Part Three offers vivid personal insights - both historical and contemporary - into the making of place and the construction of identities.

Twenty chapters, authored by leading scholars from around the world, explore the astonishing variety of building styles and traditions that have evolved over millennia in a region of diverse terrains, extreme climates and distinctive local histories. Generations of highly-skilled masons, carpenters and craftspeople have deftly employed the materials-to-hand and indigenous technologies to create urban architectural assemblages, gardens and rural landscapes that dialogue harmoniously with the natural contours and geological conditions of southern Arabia. A sharp escalation in military action and violence in the country since the 1990s has had a devastating impact on the region's rich cultural heritage. In bringing together the astute observations and reflections of an international and interdisciplinary group of acclaimed scholars, the principal aim of this book is to raise awareness among the general public and policy makers of Yemen's long history of cultural creativity, and of the very urgent need for international collaboration to protect it and its people from the destructive forces that have beset the region.Following the editor's introduction, the book is divided into three parts.
Part One introduces readers to the astonishing variety of architecture and building traditions across the country, from the Red Sea coast, eastward into the mountainous highlands, to the edge of the Sahara desert, and southward into the deep, dramatic wadis of the Hadhramaut. Part Two is dedicated to exploring the issues and the challenges of conserving and preserving Yemen's rich architectural heritage. Part Three offers vivid personal insights - both historical and contemporary - into the making of place and the construction of identities.

Fahd Abdullah holds a B.Architecture from the University of Dhamar and an M.Architecture from Sana'a' University. He has worked for Yemen's Department of Urban Planning, conducting architectural studies and preparing designs for the conservation of historic cities. He is currently employed by the Social Development Fund (SFD) as a consultant for the cultural heritage unit and he is a member of the photogrammetric team.Sabina Antonini is the Director of the Italian Archaeological Mission in Yemen for Monumenta Orientalia (Rome). From 1984 to 2013, she was archaeologist and Principal Art Historian for the Italian Mission's excavations in Yemen. Since 2012, she has also contributed to CNRS (Paris) archaeological campaigns in Ethiopia and Saudi Arabia. She is the author of nine monographs and over fifty articles on South Arabian Archaeology and Art History. Dr Antonini obtained a BA in Classical Archaeology at the University of Perugia and a PhD in Archaeology and Art History of the Near East at the University of Naples L'Orientale.Deborah Dorman was born in 1959. She grew up in a number of different countries, but the place she loved most was Ethiopia, where she lived from age 9 to 14. After attending the University of East Anglia (History), she worked in the Palestinian Occupied Territories for three years, teaching English at the University of Bir Zeit. In the 1990s she did a masters degree in Development Policy and Economics at SOAS, London University and worked with a variety of NGOs while in Yemen. Since leaving Yemen she and her family have lived in Graz, Austria.Barbara Finster received a PhD from the University of Tubingen for her study of Die Moschee von Damaskus. She conducted post-doctoral research on the Fruhe Islamische Moscheen in Iran at the University of Erlangen, where she also taught Islamic Art. She has carried out field research in Iran and Afghanistan; conducted surveys and excavations in Iraq (DAI); conducted surveys of Islamic architecture in Yemen (DAI), and carried out research in 'Anjar (Lebanon). Finster was a Professor of Islamic Art at the University of Bamberg from 1996 to 2003, and has been an Emeritus Professor since 2003.Ingrid Hehmeyer is Associate Professor of History of Science and Technology at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. She received a doctorate in Agriculture (1988) and a Master of Science (equiv.) in Pharmacy (1990), both from the University of Bonn, Germany. She specializes in human-environmental relationships in the arid regions of ancient and medieval Arabia. Her current research focuses on the history of water technology in medieval Yemen, where she investigates technical innovations in hydraulic engineering and strategies for water management that allowed people to live under harsh environmental conditions.Pamela Jerome, AIA, LEEDTM AP is a preservation architect with over 35 years' experience and President of Architectural Preservation Studio, PC, a New York City-based architecture and preservation firm. She is also an Adjunct Associate Professor at Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. Ms. Jerome is immediate past vice president of ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on Earthen Architectural Heritage (ISCEAH), and now serves on the international ICOMOS Board. Her expertise is in masonry conservation, waterproofing, and site management; she has consulted on cultural-property conservation in the US, Mediterranean, Black Sea, Middle East and Far East.Tom Leiermann did an apprenticeship in agriculture and then studied architecture at the Technical University in Berlin (1989). As an architect in Bremen, he managed various public projects in the surrounding region. In 2003, he joined the Shibam Urban Development Project in Yemen, a joint Yemeni-German enterprise managed by GIZ. Under the umbrella of various international and Yemeni institutions, he also managed conservation activities in Yemen's three World Heritage Sites: Shi

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