Welcome to our online store!
You have no items in your basket.
Close
Filters
Search

Designing Our Way to a Better World

Author/EditorFisher, Thomas (Author)
ISBN: 9780816698882
Pub Date01/05/2016
BindingPaperback
Pages256
Dimensions (mm)216(h) * 140(w) * 38(d)
€27.17
excluding shipping
Availability: Available to order but dispatch within 7-10 days
+ -

Envisioning what we need, when it doesn\u2019t yet exist: this, Thomas Fisher tells us, is what design does. And if what we need now is a better world-functioning schools, working infrastructure, thriving cities-why not design one? Fisher shows how the principles of design apply to services and systems that seem to evolve naturally, systems whose failures sometimes seem as arbitrary and inevitable as the weather. But the \u201cinvisible\u201d systems we depend on for our daily lives (in education, politics, economics, and public health) are designed every bit as much as the products we buy and the environments we inhabit-and are just as susceptible to creative reimagining.
Designing Our Way to a Better World challenges the assumptions that have led to so much poor performance in the public and private realms: that our schools cannot teach creativity, that our governments cannot predict the disasters that befall us, that our health system will protect us from pandemics, that our politics will remain polarized, that our economy cannot avoid inequality, and that our industry cannot help but pollute the environment. Targeting these assumptions, Fisher's approach reveals the power of design to synthesize our knowledge about the world into greater wholes. In doing so, this book opens up possible futures-and better futures-than the unsustainable and inequitable one we now face.

Envisioning what we need, when it doesn\u2019t yet exist: this, Thomas Fisher tells us, is what design does. And if what we need now is a better world-functioning schools, working infrastructure, thriving cities-why not design one? Fisher shows how the principles of design apply to services and systems that seem to evolve naturally, systems whose failures sometimes seem as arbitrary and inevitable as the weather. But the \u201cinvisible\u201d systems we depend on for our daily lives (in education, politics, economics, and public health) are designed every bit as much as the products we buy and the environments we inhabit-and are just as susceptible to creative reimagining.
Designing Our Way to a Better World challenges the assumptions that have led to so much poor performance in the public and private realms: that our schools cannot teach creativity, that our governments cannot predict the disasters that befall us, that our health system will protect us from pandemics, that our politics will remain polarized, that our economy cannot avoid inequality, and that our industry cannot help but pollute the environment. Targeting these assumptions, Fisher's approach reveals the power of design to synthesize our knowledge about the world into greater wholes. In doing so, this book opens up possible futures-and better futures-than the unsustainable and inequitable one we now face.

Thomas Fisher is the former dean of the College of Design and the new director of the Metropolitan Design Center at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of Designing to Avoid Disaster: The Nature of Fracture-Critical Design. His books The Invisible Element of Place: The Architecture of David Salmela, In the Scheme of Things: Alternative Thinking on the Practice of Architecture, and Salmela Architect are also published by the University of Minnesota Press.

Contents Introduction Part I. Invisible Systems 1. The Design of the Invisible 2. Design Thinking 3. The Logic of Creativity Part II. Education 4. Creative Education 5. Schools and Communities 6. Reconstructing Design Education Part III. Infrastructure 7. Fracture-Critical Failures 8. Over-Extended Infrastructure 9. Designed Disasters Part IV. The Public Realm 10. The Infrastructure of Health 11. Healthy Landscapes 12. Viral Cities Part V. Politics 13. Designer Politics 14. The Politics of No 15. Politics: Right and Wrong Part VI. Economics 16. An Opposable Economy 17. A Third Industrial Revolution 18. Meta-design Part VII. Beliefs 19. Community Resiliency 20. Evolutionary Transformation 21. Spatializing Knowledge Postscript: A Past and Possible Future Notes Index

Write your own review
  • Only registered users can write reviews
*
*
Bad
Excellent
*
*
*
)
CLOSE