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A History of Council Housing in 100 Estates

Author/EditorBoughton, John (Author)
Publisher: RIBA Publishing
ISBN: 9781914124631
Pub Date01/11/2022
BindingHardback
Pages272
Dimensions (mm)250(h) * 210(w)
In this highly-illustrated survey, John Boughton, author of Municipal Dreams, examines the remarkable history of social housing in the UK.
$61.80
excluding shipping
Availability: Available to order but not yet published
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'It was like heaven! It was like a palace, even without anything in it ... We'd got this lovely, lovely house.'

In 1980, there were well over 5 million council homes in Britain, housing around one third of the population. The right of all to adequate housing had been recognised in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but, long before that, popular notions of what constituted a 'moral economy' had advanced the idea that everyone was entitled to adequate shelter.

At its best, council housing has been at the vanguard of housing progress - an example to the private sector and a lifeline for working-class and vulnerable people. However, with the emergence of Thatcherism, the veneration of the free market and a desire to curtail public spending, council housing became seen as a problem, not a solution.

We are now in the midst of a housing crisis, with 1.4 million fewer social homes at affordable rent than in 1980.

In this highly illustrated survey, eminent social historian John Boughton, author of Municipal Dreams, examines the remarkable history of social housing in the UK. He presents 100 examples, from the almshouses of the 16th century to Goldsmith Street, the 2019 winner of the RIBA Stirling Prize. Through the various political, aesthetic and ideological changes, the well-being of community and environment demands that good housing for all must prevail.

Features:



100 examples of social housing from all over the UK, illustrated with over 250 images including photographs and sketches.
A
complete history, dating from early charitable provision to 'homes for heroes', garden villages to new towns, multi-storey tower blocks and modernist
developments to contemporary sustainable housing.
Iconic estates, including: Alton East and West, Becontree, Dawson's Heights, Donnybrook Quarter, Dunboyne Road and Park Hill.
Projects from leading architects and practices, including: Peter Barber, Neave Brown, Karakusevic Carson, Kate Macintosh and Mikhail Riches.

'It was like heaven! It was like a palace, even without anything in it ... We'd got this lovely, lovely house.'

In 1980, there were well over 5 million council homes in Britain, housing around one third of the population. The right of all to adequate housing had been recognised in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but, long before that, popular notions of what constituted a 'moral economy' had advanced the idea that everyone was entitled to adequate shelter.

At its best, council housing has been at the vanguard of housing progress - an example to the private sector and a lifeline for working-class and vulnerable people. However, with the emergence of Thatcherism, the veneration of the free market and a desire to curtail public spending, council housing became seen as a problem, not a solution.

We are now in the midst of a housing crisis, with 1.4 million fewer social homes at affordable rent than in 1980.

In this highly illustrated survey, eminent social historian John Boughton, author of Municipal Dreams, examines the remarkable history of social housing in the UK. He presents 100 examples, from the almshouses of the 16th century to Goldsmith Street, the 2019 winner of the RIBA Stirling Prize. Through the various political, aesthetic and ideological changes, the well-being of community and environment demands that good housing for all must prevail.

Features:



100 examples of social housing from all over the UK, illustrated with over 250 images including photographs and sketches.
A
complete history, dating from early charitable provision to 'homes for heroes', garden villages to new towns, multi-storey tower blocks and modernist
developments to contemporary sustainable housing.
Iconic estates, including: Alton East and West, Becontree, Dawson's Heights, Donnybrook Quarter, Dunboyne Road and Park Hill.
Projects from leading architects and practices, including: Peter Barber, Neave Brown, Karakusevic Carson, Kate Macintosh and Mikhail Riches.

John Boughton is a social historian whose blog Municipal Dreams has been one of the most widely read and respected records of council housing since its inception in 2013. His book Municipal Dreams: the Rise and Fall of Council Housing was published April 2018. He is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the School of Architecture of the University of Liverpool. John has published in the Historian and Labor History and gives talks on housing to a range of audiences.

Introduction CHAPTER 1: A 'Prehistory' of Social Housing - early parish and charitable provision; 19th century sanitary reform and building regulation; philanthropic provision 1. Almshouses and Parish Housing 1. Powis Almshouses, Chepstow 2. Parish provision in Mursley, Buckinghamshire 2. Sanitary and building reform and regulation 3. Footdee, Aberdeen 3. Philanthropic provision 4. Peabody: Peabody Square, Islington 5. Artizans', Labourers' and General Dwellings Company: Noel Park, Haringey 6. Edinburgh Co-Operative Building Company: Edinburgh Colonies CHAPTER 2: 1890-1914 - varying early forms of local authority housing and some co-partnership models 1. Municipal tenements and cottage flats 7. Millbank Estate, London 8. Hornby Street, Liverpool 2. Balcony access 9. High School Yards, Edinburgh 10. Valette Buildings, Hackney 3. Garden villages and co-partnership models 11. Burnage GV, Manchester/Brentham Garden Suburb, Ealing 4. Garden Suburbs 12. Flower Estate, Sheffield 13. Old Oak Estate, Hammersmith CHAPTER 3: 1914-1930 - the impact of the First World War; the influence of evolving policy choices on housing forms in the 1920s; prefabrication and other forms of provision 1. Munitions estates 14. Rosyth Garden City, Scotland 15. Well Hall, Greenwich 2. 'Homes for Heroes' 16. Moulescombe Estate, Brighton 17. Wollaton Park, Nottingham 18. Townhill Estate, Swansea 19. Moss Park, Glasgow 20. Sea Mills or Hillfields, Bristol 21. Becontree Estate, London 3. Early forms of prefabrication 22. Nissen-Petren Houses, Yeovil 23. Norris Green, Liverpool (Boot houses) 4. Housing associations 24. St Pancras Housing Association CHAPTER 4: 1930-1939 - the policy shift to slum clearance and rehousing; new forms of tenement housing; architectural debates and the relative insignificance of Modernism in Britain 1. Slum clearance estates 25. Knowle West, Bristol 26. Deckham Hall Estate, Gateshead 27. Wythenshawe Estate, Manchester 2. New-style tenements 28. White City, London 29. Liverpool's 1930s flats 30. Lennox House, Hackney 3. Modernist design 31. Kensal House, London 32. Quarry Hill, Leeds CHAPTER 5: 1940-1955 - the significance of wartime planning; temporary and permanent prefabs; Bevan houses; neighbourhood units; mixed development; Radburn; New Towns and Expanded Towns; model rural council housing; the origins of multi-storey 1. Temporary and permanent prefabs 33. Inverness Road and Humber Doucy Lane, Ipswich 34. Bilborough Estate, Nottingham (BISF and No-Fines houses) 2. Early post-war 35. Minerva Estate, Tower Hamlets 36. Pollok, Glasgow 37. The Creggan, Derry/Londonderry 3. Bevan houses 38. Moorlands Estate, Bath 39. Ermine Estate, Lincoln 40. Gaer Estate, Newport 4. Neighbourhood units 41. Lansbury Estate, Poplar 42. Stowlawn, Bilston (Reilly Greens) 43. Rathcoole Estate, Newton Abbey, Northern Ireland 44. New Parks Estate, Leicester 5. Mixed development 45. Somerford Grove, Hackney 46. Orlando Estate, Walsall 47. Churchill Estate, London 6. Radburn 48. Queen's Park, Wrexham 49. Middleton Estate, Gainsborough 7. New Towns and Expanded Towns 50. Crawley New Town 51. Cwmbran New Town, W

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