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Modern Architecture in Latin America: Art, Technology, and Utopia

Author/EditorCarranza L (Author)
Lara, Fernando Luiz (Author)
ISBN: 9780292762978
Pub Date05/01/2015
BindingPaperback
Pages424
Dimensions (mm)279(h) * 216(w) * 25(d)
Designed as a survey and focused on key examples and movements arranged chronologically from 1903 to 2003, this is the first comprehensive history of modern architecture in Latin America in any language.
€46.74
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Runner-up, University Co-op Robert W. Hamilton Book Award, 2015
Modern Architecture in Latin America: Art, Technology, and Utopia is an introductory text on the issues, polemics, and works that represent the complex processes of political, economic, and cultural modernization in the twentieth century. The number and types of projects varied greatly from country to country, but, as a whole, the region produced a significant body of architecture that has never before been presented in a single volume in any language. Modern Architecture in Latin America is the first comprehensive history of this important production.
Designed as a survey and focused on key examples/paradigms arranged chronologically from 1903 to 2003, this volume covers a myriad of countries; historical, social, and political conditions; and projects/developments that range from small houses to urban plans to architectural movements. The book is structured so that it can be read in a variety of ways-as a historically developed narrative of modern architecture in Latin America, as a country-specific chronology, or as a treatment of traditions centered on issues of art, technology, or utopia. This structure allows readers to see the development of multiple and parallel branches/historical strands of architecture and, at times, their interconnections across countries. The authors provide a critical evaluation of the movements presented in relationship to their overall goals and architectural transformations.

Runner-up, University Co-op Robert W. Hamilton Book Award, 2015
Modern Architecture in Latin America: Art, Technology, and Utopia is an introductory text on the issues, polemics, and works that represent the complex processes of political, economic, and cultural modernization in the twentieth century. The number and types of projects varied greatly from country to country, but, as a whole, the region produced a significant body of architecture that has never before been presented in a single volume in any language. Modern Architecture in Latin America is the first comprehensive history of this important production.
Designed as a survey and focused on key examples/paradigms arranged chronologically from 1903 to 2003, this volume covers a myriad of countries; historical, social, and political conditions; and projects/developments that range from small houses to urban plans to architectural movements. The book is structured so that it can be read in a variety of ways-as a historically developed narrative of modern architecture in Latin America, as a country-specific chronology, or as a treatment of traditions centered on issues of art, technology, or utopia. This structure allows readers to see the development of multiple and parallel branches/historical strands of architecture and, at times, their interconnections across countries. The authors provide a critical evaluation of the movements presented in relationship to their overall goals and architectural transformations.

LUIS E. CARRANZA is Professor of Architecture at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island. He is the author of Architecture as Revolution: Episodes in the History of Modern Mexico, and he has published and lectured nationally and internationally on Latin American modern architecture, focusing primarily on Mexico. FERNANDO LUIZ LARA is Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin, where he serves as Chair of the Brazil Center at the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies. He is the author of The Rise of Popular Modernist Architecture in Brazil.

Foreword by Jorge Francisco Liernur Acknowledgments (Notes toward an) Introduction 1903. Francisco Pereira Passos begins a project to "civilize" Rio de Janeiro by applying Baron Haussmann's ideas as an answer to the tropical (lack of) urbanism. 1904. Victor Meano, Francisco de Oliveira Passos, and Emile Jequier build a Latin American character with a classical vocabulary. 1906. Julian Garcia Nunez's Hospital Espanol defines a characteristic search for a new language: Secession/Art Nouveau. 1914. Jesus T. Acevedo and Federico Mariscal lecture in Mexico on the character, importance, and role of the Spanish colonial legacy. 1915. Antonin Nechodoma introduces the Prairie style to Puerto Rico. 1922. In an attempt to create a building expressive of the "cosmic race," Jose Vasconcelos inaugurates in Mexico City the headquarters of the Secretaria de Educacion Publica and formalizes the muralist project. 1923. Mario Palanti: Palacio Barolo and Palacio Salvo 1924. Martin Fierro presents Alberto Prebisch and Ernesto Vautier's Ciudad Azucarera en Tucuman and formalizes the connections and interests in architecture among the literary and artistic avant-gardes. 1925. Modern architecture begins with Gregori Warchavchik and Rino Levi publishing manifestos on the new architecture; catching up to the 1922 Semana de Arte Moderna. 1925-A. Estridentopolis en 1975: Literary Architecture and the Avant-Garde 1925-B. Jose Villagran Garcia, Instituto de Higiene y Granja Sanitaria 1928. The Columbus Memorial Lighthouse Competition sparks an investigation into what architecture for Latin America should be like. 1929-A. The Ibero-American Exhibition opens in Seville, revealing the complex and contradictory relations between Spain and its former American colonies. 1929-B. Le Corbusier's first encounters with South America: lectures and early projects for Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay 1929-C. With the History of the Skyscraper, Francisco Mujica articulates the skyscraper's Latin American dimension. 1929. Sergio Larrain and Jorge Arteaga's Oberpauer Building initiates a new direction in Chilean architecture. 1930-A. Getulio Vargas takes power in Brazil and appoints twenty-eight-year-old Lucio Costa as director of the Escola Nacional de Belas Artes (ENBA). 1930-B. Commemorating the centenary of its independence, Uruguay takes the first Soccer World Cup at home, and Montevideo is at the center of its modern ambitions. 1930. Flavio de Carvalho, "City of the Naked Man" 1931. Juan O'Gorman, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Houses and Studios 1933. In his Platicas sobre arquitectura lecture, Juan O'Gorman highlights the existing polemics between functionalism and academic architecture. 1936. Le Corbusier is back in Rio de Janeiro. 1936-A. The Kavanagh Building is finished, becoming the tallest skyscraper in Latin America. 1936-B. Francisco Salamone: Fascism and Monumental Architecture in the Pampa 1936-C. Julio Vilamajo, School of Engineering 1937. Wladimiro Acosta's Vivienda y ciudad highlights the relationship between ecology, new forms of leisure, the house, and the city. 1937. Cine Gran Rex and Argentine Classicist Modernism 1938. Characteristic of the growing reach of surrealism into architecture and Latin America, the Chilean architect-trained artist Matta publishes "Sensitive Mathematics-Architecture of Time" in Minotaure. 1938. Joaquin Torres-Garcia, Monumento cosmico, Montevideo, Uruguay 1939. The European diaspora brings architectural talents to Latin America on an unprecedented scale. 1939. The Brazilian pavilion at New York World's Fair 1941. Pampulha represents an encounter that would change the future of Brazil. 1942. Amancio Williams, Casa sobre el Arroyo 1943-A. The Brazil Builds exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York highlights the architectural and political interests of U.S. relations with Brazil. 1943-B. Town Planning Associates (TPA) is commissioned to design a new Brazilian town around an airplane

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